Robert Kraft Is Still A Scumbag

 67 replies

This is an editorial, and in no way reflects the views and opinions of Arrowhead Guys or its’ contributors. I’m just spitting out my ideas …

Once again, the punishments of the poor are not reflected on the wealthy elite. While the Law refuses to put the squeeze on billionaire Robert Kraft for what looks — for all intents and purposes — like patronage to a human trafficking ring, there are countless other men and women doing time behind bars for offenses far less callous.

It may be hard to swallow, but this is the world we live in today.

However, I refuse to let this continuation of typical American justice piss me off. If I allow it to go to my head like most people, I’ll end up shafting an audience that deserves to hear the facts. The simple fact is — he should not be getting off.

The situation, in case you weren’t aware, is that Robert Kraft — owner of the New England Patriots — decided to thrust himself into a predicament with an establishment in South Florida that has been allegedly connected to a human trafficking ring … and was allegedly caught on video that has yet to be forcibly released.

Now, according to the Palm Beach prosecuting attorney, a plea deal has been offered to throw the owner a bone. This same offer was presented to twenty-four of the other men entangled in this sticky situation.

My first question is this: what is a plea bargain? From what I understand (Mr. Seth Keysor would have the real answer), you can plea down for nothing besides the fact you were a “first time offender.” That makes sense if your crime is, oh I dunno, reckless driving, petty theft, maybe some excessive jaywalking. Participation in alleged human trafficking seems to penetrate a bit farther into the “deviant” realm than just being a normal run-of-the-mill whack job.

My personal issue is that we haven’t seen confirmation of the trafficking. We have a fist-full of reports that seem to insinuate strongly that this was the case. But, if Kraft is allowed to beat off these charges, what happens if we find out trafficking was indeed involved at this establishment? You can’t charge him again (Double jeopardy, but again, consult with our not-so-local Football Lawyer).

Kraft is a scumbag. Whether he only cheated on his girlfriend by purchasing tug jobs, or he willingly participated in some of the most horrible things you can subject a human being to, he simply isn’t a good person. The entire Patriots organization should realize the climax of their organization is over (though they won’t, because … well, dumbass Dave Portnoy).

Yes, I know we in Kansas City are dealing with our own “innocent until proven guilty” issues at the moment, but there’s a difference. Video — the medium that typically gets players suspended for long periods of time, sometimes indefinitely — has been recorded of Kraft’s crimes.

The question now is — will the League treat him accordingly?

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Fozzyboyd
Fozzyboyd
03/22/2019 10:12 am

There is a lot wrong with this post. Legally, you are fairly wrong in a lot of your assumptions and you seem a little biased because of who the subject is. (Understandable, Kraft and the Patriots are easy to dislike) First, “what is a plea bargain? From what I understand…you can plea down for nothing besides the fact you were a “first time offender.”” A plea bargain is used in almost every case. There are always negotiations in every case, everything from a traffic ticket to murder and rape have plea negotiations. They are a vital part of keeping our system from being more overloaded than it is, to allow both the prosecution and defense to come to a mutal agreement on what the potential punishment should be based on the unique circumstances of every individual case. For example, are you going to treat a first time offender the same as you are a person with 10 violent convictions? You typically aren’t. What if that first time offender has successfully completed drug treatment and taken responsibility for his actions? You typically aren’t. In the same sense, say there is a murder but every witness you have is a drug addict or hard core felon which means you either have credibility issues or witnesses that will not be available. That puts getting any conviction at trial at a bigger risk. Do you take the chance going to trial and getting nothing or do you take a plea putting the person in prison for less time? The ability to negotiate pleas allows prosecutors to find what they believe to be an appropritate sentence given the unique circumstances that surround every case. The problem with people that complain about plea bargains, or the legal system in general, are its usually people who have no idea about the legal system or they’ve heard random unsubstantiated stories about some random case without knowing the unique circumstances surrounding the case with either legal or factual issues (typically from people that don’t understand the legal system). Most of the time when people hear of stories they are… Read more »

KCChef
KCChef
03/21/2019 7:40 pm

I heard his “Partners” in these Sex Acts were 39 & 58 Yrs Old …

ArmChairQB
ArmChairQB
03/21/2019 5:03 pm

I’ll be taking shots at this guy to every Pats fan I will inevitably meet in the future. Another brutal example of how being wealthy allows you to pretty much walk away from punishment that others would get the damn book thrown at them. Shucks.. oh well.. it’s been like this for what seems like ever.

Tarkus
Reply to  ArmChairQB
03/21/2019 5:05 pm

1. The same deal was offered to 24 other men.

2. Kraft turned it down.

Fozzyboyd
Fozzyboyd
Reply to  ArmChairQB
03/22/2019 9:21 am

Being wealthy gave him the same opportunity that it gave numerous others that may or may not be wealthy? That doesn’t make any sense.

Also, soliciting a prostitute is typically a very low charge in any state, almost always a misdemeanor. Most prosecution offices offer diversion for this type of crime so the typical john doesn’t even get convicted. Generally, if they don’t do diversion, there is a fine, maybe probation but almost no one ever does any time for soliciting a prostitute, even if they do, they aren’t doing anything substantial, maybe a weekend in jail.

4thQtrMagic
03/21/2019 4:35 pm

He is a scumbag. But I believe the same deal was offered to the poor and wealthy suspects a like. So I guess he is a lucky scumbag. He must admit his guilt to get out of the charges and not have them on his record. He will have to do the community service, and prostitution classes according to the deal.

Tarkus
Reply to  4thQtrMagic
03/21/2019 4:44 pm

I guess you missed the part where he turned down the deal.

A Lunar Ting
Reply to  Tarkus
03/21/2019 4:53 pm

Makes me wonder if the police oopsied collecting evidence somewhere and the Kraft lawyers caught it.

gonzangkc11
gonzangkc11
03/21/2019 4:18 pm

Lawyers:
K. Hunt – video gets released – Hunt released by Chiefs & will be suspended for 8 games
(kicking lady once – don’t have audio of conversation – still should kick people)
R. Kraft – lawyers trying to block video – TBD punishment by NFL
(prostitution multiple time on video & probably more than the 2 times on video & potentially sex traffic ladies)

I won’t even get into races.

Spider
Spider
03/21/2019 3:51 pm

The simple fact is — he should not be getting off

Too late!

gonzangkc11
gonzangkc11
03/21/2019 3:51 pm

I want to see the VIDEOS…
So I know what to wear for my Halloween costume 🙂

Now Kraft lawyers are doing lawyer BS – trying to block the release

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  gonzangkc11
03/21/2019 4:51 pm

Why is it BS to do legal things to protect yourself? This isnb’t the Laquan McDonald case in Chicago, where both the city and the police fought tooth and nail to suppress the video that showed that not only did the cop who killed him lie about just about everything, so did all the officers there who agreed with and supported his claims in their own reports.

Kraft isn’t doing a cover-up, the real BS was the attempted cover-up for a guilty cop in Chicago. Or do you believe that all video evidence in every case be made available to the public? If so, keep in mind that it’s gonna do a lot of damage to a lot of people, very few of them rich and no small few of the innocent, as well.

Using a cannon to swat a fly is a really bad idea.

gonzangkc11
gonzangkc11
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 9:18 pm

K hunt video released, why?
I’m sure he had lawyers trying 2 protect him

The difference is $$$ and race

I’m talking nfl only

Fozzyboyd
Fozzyboyd
Reply to  gonzangkc11
03/22/2019 10:35 am

There’s a big difference between Hunt’s videos being released and Krafts. First, just generally the fact that there are lewd acts on one and violence on the other. Rightly or wrongly, our society looks at sex and violence differently, especially depending on the level of violence. Generally the news can show, and the public is more accepting of seeing a person getting punched over seeing a sex act or something violent but extremely gory. They also are probably not going to release a video that may show the identity of a sex worker, performing a sexual act, who may be a victim of further crimes as well, trafficking. Second, Hunt’s case was not being prosecuted and had already been declined by the prosecutors office in Ohio. There is no open criminal case to protect so its easier to have a video released. If there is a case that is filed, then there is limited information that can be released. While the public wants videos to be released all the time, that’s not in the best interest in criminal cases for either the defendant, the victim, or prosecution. Typically, people look at those videos through emotion and not through a critical legal trained eye on whether or not it meets the level needed to be a criminal act. Also, what is usually shown is only a small part and not the whole video in context which may change public opinion. In a criminal case, putting something out in the public sphere that can sway a possible jury before they are ever given the law or all the context is unfair to all sides. Generally, whether people believe it or not, the criminal process is set up to try and be as fair as possible to all sides. Almost any prosecutor you will ever meet will say they want a fair trial based only on the facts and the law and not on unfair outside influences. So there are plenty of legitimate reasons, even ones I didn’t post, that are why a video isn’t released that have nothing to do with $$$… Read more »

probablyamistake
probablyamistake
03/21/2019 3:37 pm

Don’t hold back Dave, tell us what you really think 😉

Anthony Stratton
Reply to  probablyamistake
03/21/2019 6:09 pm

Dave was about to explode writing this.

Slayer0810
Slayer0810
03/21/2019 1:05 pm

will the League treat him accordingly?

And the answer, unequivocally, is no.

MidKan Chiefs Lifer
MidKan Chiefs Lifer
03/21/2019 12:59 pm

Well I can get on board with the he is a scumbag take. But unless you prove to me that he knew about the girls being human trafficking victims, I don’t in this instance buy into the fact that he’s getting off of something no one else would. It isn’t like solicitation is a six-year sentence for every poor bastard it’s ever got a bj in a massage parlor.

Slayer0810
Slayer0810
Reply to  MidKan Chiefs Lifer
03/21/2019 1:09 pm

Legally, I would agree. But this article also touched on the NFL’s treatment of “conduct detrimental” in the past. And in that arena, I think we can all agree that he’s going to get off with far less (maybe none?) punishment than a player caught in the same situation.

Tarkus
Reply to  Slayer0810
03/21/2019 3:46 pm

Who was the last player punished for paying for a handy?

Slayer0810
Slayer0810
Reply to  Tarkus
03/22/2019 7:28 am

Since when did precedence matter to Roger Goodell when playing judge, jury, and executioner?

Stuckinpackland
Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 12:19 pm

This is absurd he was not “participating” in a human trafficking ring, and it is wrong to simply assume he knew these girls were part of one. Guy got some blowies at a massage parlor, whoopdyshit. That happens all over the US all day every day. So hes rich, get over it, he also had no idea he was being recorded which is a crime. So the question stands, who’s the bigger offender? The dude who paid for a BJ? or the cops who decided it was ok to video tape people getting “massages” without them knowing?

Dave B.
dave9600
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 12:23 pm

he also had no idea he was being recorded which is a crime.

comment image

01lowbird
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 12:39 pm

he also had no idea he was being recorded which is a crime.

or the cops who decided it was ok to video tape people getting “massages” without them knowing?

ehh……. That’s not true and especially in the case above.

Dave B.
dave9600
Reply to  01lowbird
03/21/2019 12:42 pm

They’re supposed to hang a sign on the front door warning all patrons that there is a criminal investigation in progress and that all sex acts are being recorded.

Stuckinpackland
Stuckinpackland
Reply to  01lowbird
03/21/2019 1:16 pm

Uh yeah it is, federal law prohibits recording in a private place without the consent of at least one person(s) unless a warrant is previously served. Therefore, if the owners of this shady establish didnt consent to this, the video will be thrown out. However if they knew about the warrant and subsequent recording and still allowing their masseuses to give BJs? Well then they’re just idiots.

BDChiefsFan
BDChiefsFan
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 1:54 pm

they probably had probable cause, and a judge signed off on the warrant to record?

Stuckinpackland
Stuckinpackland
Reply to  BDChiefsFan
03/21/2019 2:05 pm

Right, so my question is who got served said warrant?

Dave B.
dave9600
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 2:16 pm

“Police were able to install hidden cameras after obtaining a special warrant.”

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/14/robert-kraft-case-shows-how-police-use-hidden-cameras-to-get-evidence.html

Dave B.
dave9600
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 2:20 pm

Delayed-notice search warrants have been around since the ’70s. .

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 2:25 pm

You’re sorta right in that it would take a court order to secretly tape the place, depending on how it was done. That said, the police would not serve them with a warrant to get it done, because that would kinda defeat the purpose.

Leaf
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 2:53 pm

What? Tipping the bad guys off that you are trying to catch them doing something bad isn’t a good idea? Who would have thought?

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  Leaf
03/21/2019 2:59 pm

I know, really?

Leaf
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 2:50 pm

Not true. You can get warrants for surveillance without the party being watched’s consent. You just need to have enough evidence to prove probably cause to a judge. If the surveillance was legal, and this whole trafficking case hangs on it being such, Kraft has no ground to stand on. Because once the surveillance is legal, it doesn’t matter if you were the subject of the investigation of not. Anything caught during the surveillance can be used.

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  Leaf
03/21/2019 3:08 pm

And to re-iterate on the plea deal those 25 men were offered, if all 25 of those cases went to trial, there would be 25 defense lawyers combing through the evidence, looking for any mistakes the police might have made during the investigation. And if one of them, just one, can find a problem with something, it would ruin the trafficking trials.

So it comes down to the choice between high-risk, low-reward vs. low risk, high reward. Why do people want to jeopardize sending the actual traffickers to prison for serious felonies in order to get someone famous on a misdemeanor? As a part of the slavery investigations, he’s barely a blip on the radar.

I don’t care for Kraft, either, but messing up the legal system just to convict him of something minor is going ‘way too far.

ArmChairQB
ArmChairQB
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 5:05 pm

But if this is a sting by police then they likely have warrants to such things. C’mon now.

Dave B.
dave9600
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 2:33 pm

“This is absurd he was not “participating” in a human trafficking ring, and it is wrong to simply assume he knew these girls were part of one.”

Isn’t it also wrong to assume that he didn’t know.?

workingmansdead
Reply to  dave9600
03/21/2019 2:39 pm

I mean, basic human decency. Soliciting a prostitute doesn’t mean that you don’t have the basic decency to not condone or encourage human trafficking. Maybe I’m just a hopeless optimist.

Stuckinpackland
Stuckinpackland
Reply to  workingmansdead
03/21/2019 2:41 pm

100%

Dave B.
dave9600
Reply to  workingmansdead
03/21/2019 2:52 pm

I think it’s wrong to make assumptions in general.

Leaf
Reply to  dave9600
03/21/2019 2:59 pm

In general yes. But in this case, he’d have to be an idiot to not know what’s going on. No legal prostitute is that cheap unless they are also a meth head.

Over the top hyperbole aside, even though I think it is nearly impossible that he didn’t at least suspect the place was shady, if they can’t prove it, he shouldn’t be prosecuted as such.

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  Leaf
03/21/2019 3:40 pm

Have you frequented many such establishments? You can say that “he shoulda known” all day long, but on what basis? Remember, these places operated out in the open, so they probably did provide ordinary spa services to the general public. Anyone at all could walk in and ask for a pedicure, and they almost certainly would have gotten a nice pedicure. If they didn’t, people would quickly suspect something was up, therefore to stay in operation, they also have to function as a normal spa. Or are you saying that if someone wanders in for a mani/pedi, they too should suspect slaves to be on the staff, or “see it in their eyes”? Rubbish, they wouldn’t notice, you wouldn’t notice, and I probably wouldn’t notice, either. If you walked into one of those spas for an ordinary service, you wouldn’t be thinking prostitution, and you wouldn’t notice a thing. The whole unspoken idea that these were filthy joints tucked away in out-of-sight corners needs to go away. Some of these places operated in strip malls with many passers-by, but all of them appeared to look quite ordinary. The whole “Well, Kraft should have known, because *I* would have known!” thing is based on wishful thinking and hindsight. It’s a massive, blatant assumption, not a reasoned opinion. People are horrible eyewitnesses when they /see/ something bad happen. There are few indeed who can see there is something wrong going without foreknowledge. Go walk into some day spas, get back to me when you find one where you notice that prostitution is going on – without asking, just by observation – and get back to me when you have successfully shut down one for having sex slaves. Not solo, of course, but find something the police can use against the business WRT slavery. I’ll wait and watch the Chiefs stack up SB rings while you’re doing that. I’m tired of people claiming to be some kind of psychic Sherlock Holmes, because that’s the entire basis of the “I would have known, so he should have known” thing. Sorry folks, nobody here is… Read more »

A Lunar Ting
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 4:56 pm

Cindy Yang was selling access to many high rolling clients…

I have a hard time believing this.

Dave B.
dave9600
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 5:35 pm

Here’s the thing… you don’t usually just wander into a spa and get jerked off. You generally know of these places and you go there because they’ll jerk you off. Now, maybe he didn’t know to what extent these people were dealing in prostitution but it’s a good possibility there was more than just hand jobs going on and he knew about it.

So… the possibility certainly exists that he could have known… but there’s no reason to say that he should have known.

Leaf
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 9:28 pm

There is a huge difference between a run and tug joint and a nail salon. If it’s offering that kind of….extra customer service, that’s a huge red flag for human trafficking. If he just got a standard message, he’d have an argument that he didn’t know. But than again if he just got a standard message, he wouldn’t be in the mess he’s in.

Stuckinpackland
Stuckinpackland
Reply to  dave9600
03/21/2019 2:41 pm

Yes, “before u blow me, are u here against your will?”

Fire_FG_the_moron
Fire_FG_the_moron
Reply to  dave9600
03/21/2019 10:04 pm

Thus, being presumed innocent until PROVEN guilty in a court of law. It will be argued both ways.

Prosecutors will say he knew of the human trafficking aspect and should be convicted of such.
Defense will say he didnt know and was involuntarily involved at best and should be found not guilty.

The prosecutors bear the burden of proof. If they cant convince a jury, he walks. Except for he walks because of billions of dollars on his side.

d-block
d-block
Reply to  Stuckinpackland
03/21/2019 2:57 pm

He was getting a rub and tug from a sex parlor. He contributed whether you approve or not.

ChiefsfaninOR
ChiefsfaninOR
03/21/2019 12:14 pm

Is this a joke? The numerous puns/double entendres littered throughout the article, which I took as an editorial/opinion piece, caused this post to lower itself to the level of Kraft himself. For shame.

Leaf
03/21/2019 12:11 pm

It’s only double jeopardy if it goes to a jury verdict and he’s acquitted. The problem here is that if he wasn’t an actual part of the ring, it doesn’t matter if he knew about it or not. He still would only be charged with solicitation. Now the judge would be less lenient during sentencing if it was proven that he knew, and public opinion would tank dramatically. But he wouldn’t get any different charges.

VChiefsFan
VChiefsFan
03/21/2019 12:04 pm

This isn’t and will never be about justice. Its about the treatment of the lesser by the upper. Its about those that are rich getting a different level of justice than those who are poor. If it was about justice, they would never offer a plea deal to anyone who has anything to do with human slavery. Every one of them would be given a public defender, and a quick trial. Hang em all, let god sort them out……. 😛

Leaf
Reply to  VChiefsFan
03/21/2019 12:18 pm

That’s the way it’s been throughout history and it will never change. It might not always be wealth as the diving factor, but as long as we continue to separate ourselves into groups, at least one group will always place itself above the others and no be held to the same standard.

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  VChiefsFan
03/21/2019 12:54 pm

Here’s some things. First is that this was not simply Kraft’s deal. 24 other men were offered the same deal. Those other 24 men aren’t as wealthy as he is, so he’s not getting a special deal crafted just for him. Prosecuting all those men would be expensive and time-consuming, resources better applied to prosecuting those who were traffickers. Further, since any police error that comes out during any of those trials becomes part of the public record and could jeopardize that much more serious case. They don’t want 25 lawyers examining evidence for that sort of thing over relative peanuts cases. Next is that solicitation of prostitution isn’t the sort of lawbreaking that draws a big sentence, anyway, but people have misunderstood the whole human trafficking aspect of this, mostly by convincing themselves that the establishment would have screamed “sex slaves!”, so Kraft /must/ have known about it and went there because of it. There is zero evidence to support that load of rubbish, it’s just people making things up and then using “logic” and “reason” to disguise this fact. Truth of the matter is that these were public storefronts and quite visible, and those who claim that if they walked in, they would know that slavery was going on are full of it. No, they would /not/ “see it in their eyes”. Finally, let’s get back to the whole rich/poor thing, because there’s a certain amount of natural selection involved here, because while there are likely a few poor men who spend a major segment of their income on prostitutes, generally it’s people who are better off who do so. Simple economics, not some conspiracy of rich vs. poor in the courts, and even if they tried throwing the justice system out the window, the way you suggest, it would make things worse, in the long run, any biased replacement intended to “make things fair” by discriminating against the rich would have exactly the opposite effect. The more special exceptions you add to a system, the less stable it gets, and the more exploits get opened up. Laws… Read more »

VChiefsFan
VChiefsFan
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 1:47 pm

OK, a few things on this. First and utmost, if you go to a rub and tug establishment, and you don’t know that you’re supporting human trafficking, then you’ve not been paying attention. Every news org has done a story or article on this over the last 5 years, so this shouldn’t be a surprise for anyone. Stop by a truck stop lately? There’s flyers and posters telling you what to watch out for and how to report suspected trafficking. Point being, this isn’t a breaking story, those places are bad, and the people who go to them are worse!

Next, the solicitation of prostitution is a crime. And probably a much worse one than the charge of prostitution itself. I’m betting that no “John” was ever manipulated or forced into paying for sex. Unless you want to use the “Incel” arguments, and then if so, don’t! That’s one step away from human trafficking itself.

Lastly, everyone knows there’s no simple fix for our justice system, but imagine how few people would willing support these places, if they knew they would be forced to rely on a public defender…………….

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  VChiefsFan
03/21/2019 2:54 pm

First paragraph, I disagree. You’re assuming that there are lots of “rub and tug” businesses staffed by slaves. The vast majority, I expect, are not. It’s simply a matter of numbers. If such places are usually staffed with sex slaves, then we’d be hearing about this sort of thing on a weekly or monthly basis. If it were as common and obvious as folks are talking about, that’s what would be happening, but it’s not. Ergo, while there are lots of these “rub and tug” places around, very few have sex slaves on the staff. As for solicitation of prostitution, that’s a misdemeanor. Human trafficking, by comparison, is a serious felony. Why do you want everyone who solicits prostitution to be convicted of a felony? No wishful thinking, like “I would have known, so he should have know”, please, as you know nothing of the sort. If the “signs were obvious”, the police would have moved in at once instead of doing surveillance, because the evidence would obviously be there. They did not do that. Further, not many prostitutes are actually slaves, many enjoy the work. Unfortunately the shutdown of Backpage dot com has forced the freelancer into more dangerous working conditions. But you know who got hurt even more by that shutdown? Those trapped in the slavery side of the business. Why? Because those who got access to the site could network and find help there, as other prostitutes pointed them to where they couuld finds services that could help or by creating paths to freedom for them, or simply providing a refuge for an escapee. And despite the propaganda, FOSTA/SESTA had nothing to do with that shutdown, as it hadn’t come into force yet. So feel free to look down on prostitutes as horrible, immoral people. Just remember that there has never been a time in human history that the laws were able to do away with prostitution. However, in the times and places where it was legal, the business was relatively clean and safe. Hell, look at Nevada as an example of that. Those brothels are not… Read more »

Leaf
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 3:19 pm

I’d disagree with your first assumption. There are thousands of illegal message parlors that are involved in human trafficking in the US alone. It’s unclear if that’s the majority of “happy ending” joints as even the ones that aren’t, aren’t going to advertise that they aren’t. But the idea that human trafficking is a sample size of the rub and tug business is a bad assumption. It is at the very least a significant portion of the industry.

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  Leaf
03/21/2019 3:42 pm

“There are thousands of illegal message parlors that are involved in human trafficking in the US alone. ”

Please provide a cite for this assertion, I want to know the factual basis for it.

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  VChiefsFan
03/21/2019 1:18 pm

Trivia info: IIRC, this quote at the end dates back to the medieval period, after a city hand been conquered. Since many of the people living in the city were heretics (thus the reason for attacking), but many were faithful, the decision-maker (King, general or whatever) at the time was asked what should be done with the inhabitants. And in good Christian fashion of the time, his answer was “Kill them all, God will know his own”. And so all were killed, innocent as well as guilty.

It’s a fun expression, I know, but it has some grisly roots, since he didn’t care that innocent people were being killed by his order. Something to think about, next time y’all feel like using it.

VChiefsFan
VChiefsFan
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 1:34 pm

I actually knew that piece of trivia, but I still like the saying. Especially since I once had it printed on a T-shirt when I was selected for jury duty. Funny thing, I was excused right off……….

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  VChiefsFan
03/21/2019 2:59 pm

Good for you kniowing that, it isn’t commonly known. However, part of the reason I tossed that up was to illustrate how mindless, merciless, and brutal it can be. And you know, we may seriously disagree on this, but I’m ejoying this discussion, because you are actually discussing it, and not tossing a bunch of venom around. In short, you are pla7ying both fair and nice.

Hell of a lot better than we used to have back at AP, don’t you agree?

Cheers.

VChiefsFan
VChiefsFan
Reply to  BleedingRedAndGold
03/21/2019 3:08 pm

Its a sports blog, not going to sroke out lol. But yes the convos here tend to be much better.

BleedingRedAndGold
Reply to  VChiefsFan
03/21/2019 3:50 pm

Since I started here, I have done my best to lead by example in the comments sections. It must be working, because from some of the things I’ve heard injclude me being a key part of setting up the culture here. Coulda fooled me, but I doubt it was empty praise. Those folks are smart and well-informed as to what goes on around here.

But yeah, here at AG we can discuss topics that can get pretty heated without things dissolving into a bloodbath, they was they did over there. Sweet Peeny said of AP, “We’re all adults here”, but here at AG, we dno’t go in for slogans like that, we actually act like adults. Makes for a very pleasant change, and is a huge deviation from most comments sections on the internet. If I played a small role in that, so much the better.

I hope it’s an “infection” that spreads. 😉

Nasrani
Nasrani
03/21/2019 12:01 pm

Is that guy wearing a Tony Moeaki jersey?

Dave B.
dave9600
03/21/2019 11:53 am

tl;dr

Puns.

Simtex
Simtex
03/21/2019 11:35 am

comment image?

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