Community OutSpeech: Seth Keysor Interview Part 3/3

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Over the weekend I had a chance to catch up with Seth Keysor of the Athletic for an exclusive AG Community OutSpeech interview. With nearly an hour of high quality Q’n’A recorded, I decided to break it up into a 3 part series.

For Part 3/3 we continued our chat, finishing off with some free law advice for a precarious situation and answer hot Twitter debates once and for all.

Next on Part 3/3: We talk Twitter

Part 1:

Part 2:

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dablueguyStramtoReidLeafAnthony StrattonBleedingRedAndGold Recent comment authors
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dablueguy
dablueguy

Great job with these.

StramtoReid
StramtoReid

I enjoyed the interview series with Seth, I’m not sure if Tony is joking about trading Jones, but I would consider it. I guess it depends on his going rate. There certain positions we need to do good at drafting to save money on the salary cap. CB and edge rushers are two of them. If we can’t get a starter we might as well draft another position.

I can’t get in the mock draft, because I have no idea who will be available. I agree we need to build a defense with cornerbacks. We need some kind of pass rush too.

The draft can’t come fast enough !

BleedingRedAndGold

I’m disappointed with Seth for leaving out the distinct possibility that it was a false or mistaken report. By leaving that out, he lends credibility to the speculation that Hill probably did something wrong. And as for the conviction, maybe it was a felony but the sentence was a suspended one. They don’t just hand out suspended sentences for serious felonies.

Additionally, prosecutors don’t always select a charge based on best fit to exactly what happened, but often choose charges that can cover the situation and have the best chance of getting a convictions. And that’s not even beginning to discuss the more extreme examples. Remember the young man from some years ago who killed himself because of the insane level of charges and sentences that had been leveled against him? Let’s not forget that what he did was “steal” information that not only was the next thing to “free”, but had been slated for being moved to completely free of charge.

For that, he was basically facing life in prison without possibility of parole. No wonder he killed himself, he knew that the prosecutor wasn’t out to get justice, she was out to get him. While that’s an extreme example, charge-stacking and overcharging are quite commonly used to leverage plea agreements. It’s quicker and easier than taking a case to trial. And if I know one thing about prosecutors who are running for office, they just love to brag about how many people they send to jail/prison as part of their campaign.

And they don’t talk about /how/ they convicted so many people at such a high rate. To me, that’s telling.

Leaf
Leaf

Remember the young man from some years ago who killed himself because of the insane level of charges and sentences that had been leveled against him? Let’s not forget that what he did was “steal” information that not only was the next thing to “free”, but had been slated for being moved to completely free of charge.

Sounds like you might be referring to Aaron Swartz. If that’s the case, the information he stole was never going to be free. It was academic journals on JSTOR, which he had been arguing for years should be free (and they should). The issue with him isn’t that he stole stuff from JSTOR and there wasn’t a legitimate case against him. It’s the way the prosecution handled it. First Massachusetts threw anything and everything at him. They were then pushed out of the way by the feds, who charged him with 9 more felonies. There are murderers and child molesters that don’t serve a much time or pay the fines he was looking at. All for downloading some academic papers.

VChiefsFan
VChiefsFan

Great interview series! Loved listening to them while at work, but I did disagree with a few of the points. 😛

ChiefUdall
ChiefUdall

Curious, what points?